gambler

What Ever Happened to Adrian Massey?

Adrian Massey was a horse racing enthusiast and computer programmer who ran a website on horse racing statistics that allowed people to test their own theories on potentially profitable betting systems.

On his website – www.adrianmassey.com – you could sort by course, distance, trainer, jockey and a myriad of other factors and see what results came out for selected criteria over a given period.

So you could see if certain approaches were profitable and then test them in real time, preferably paper-trading at first.

The statistics were based on over 200,000 races, so there was a wealth of data to go on 

However, in 2011, Adrian closed the site (or stopped updating it), after 12 years of operation, citing personal reasons. He had planned to close the site in 2002, so had operated it for an additional 9 years beyond that!

There was much disappointment in the betting community at the announcement, as the site was very popular, for understandable reasons. 

The site was free to use and the only thing Adrian asked for was voluntary donations to sponsor his marathon efforts, which apparently raised over £170,000 for charity.

So with such a popular site and formidable reputation, the question remains: what ever happened to Adrian Massey?

Well there is scant information about what Adrian is doing now. The website was always something he ran on the side, secondary to his main career in computing, so perhaps he just didn’t have enough time to continue operating the site.

Although one expects if he brought it back he would probably make a substantial amount of money from selling subscriptions to it.

But that is not for everyone and perhaps Adrian had other priorities in life. It is a great shame, because his website was much admired by the punters and betting system enthusiasts alike. 

Alternative Options

Anyway, with the Adrian Massey site no longer in action, what are the alternatives for checking past racing statistics and backtesting potential betting systems? 

Well, here we have a look at some of the best options:

Flat Stats

The most established website for testing horse racing systems and checking stats is flatstats.co.uk. There is an absolute wealth of data on the site and a huge quantity of statistics. There is probably everything a follower of the Adrian Massey site would want. However, it does come at a cost, with monthly subscriptions running at £35 at the time of writing and 3 month subscriptions at £85.

Pro Form Racing

Having been around since 1995, Pro Form Racing is an established and professional software package including a variety of tools, including statistics, form and speed ratings and tissue prices. It is used by a number of professional gamblers and has a systems builder which you can use to test various angles. Subscriptions come at £10 per day, £20 for a week, £50 for 4 weeks – all for the race guides – and £195 for 8 weeks for the platinum package which includes all the tools.

Horse Race Base

The horseracebase site includes system builders, a ratings machine, results database, stalls analyser, trends, profiles of trainers and jockeys and a wealth of other statistics for users. At the time of writing they are not accepting new members, although it says they may do so soon. If they do, there are free trials available for three days. 

 

Conclusion

So there you have it, some potential alternatives to the very popular Adrian Massey site. If you know of any other system builder websites, please do drop us a line at info@honestbettingreviews.com and we would be interested to check out any alternatives.

Oh, and if anyone has heard what Adrian Massey is up to now, please let us know as well!

2 replies
  1. Paul
    Paul says:

    Hi Honestbettingreviews,
    I was interested in the Adrian Massey review you did, have you ever done a review on informracing out of interest?

    Reply
    • Dan
      Dan says:

      Hi Paul,

      Thanks for your interest. We haven’t done a review of informracing but have heard of the service. I think they also produce an in-play tool that I’ve used myself and is quite good.

      Kind regards,

      Dan

      Reply

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